Category: Activities

The best golf courses in Cornwall

Play golf where the land meets the sea at one of Cornwall’s scenic golf courses, with big skies, expansive seas and premium landscapes suiting golfers of all abilities.

We’ve curated a list of the top 5 golfing destinations in Cornwall that promise not just an exceptional game but an unforgettable experience against the stunning backdrop of Cornwall’s coastline.

Perranporth

Perranporth Golf Club is a haven for golf enthusiasts seeking a dynamic course set amidst the mesmerising dunes. With breathtaking views of golden sands, this course caters to all skill levels and offers some of the finest links golf on the north Cornish coast.

Find a Perranporth retreat

Bude & North Cornwall

The Bude & North Cornwall Golf Club, with its links-style layout, promises an elegant and challenging round seconds from Crooklets beach. Surrounded by panoramic views of the countryside and the water, this course is a testament to Cornwall’s golfing prowess.

Find a Bude retreat

Fistral

Fistral Beach is renowned for its world-class surfing, but did you know it’s also a hotspot for golf? The Newquay Golf Club at Fistral offers a unique golfing experience directly next to the stunning coastline. Discover why Fistral is not just for surfers but also a perfect destination for golf enthusiasts.

Find a Fistral retreat

Carlyon Bay

For those seeking a championship-level course in a luxurious setting, Carlyon Bay Golf Club is the epitome of golfing excellence. Nestled in the lap of luxury, this course offers a refined golfing experience on the Carlyon Bay clifftop. With beautifully manicured fairways and highly advanced professionals on site, you’re guaranteed a premium experience.

Find a Carlyon Bay retreat

Trevone

Situated along Cornwall’s rugged north coast between Harlyn Bay and Padstow, Trevone Bay Golf Club offers golfers a unique and picturesque setting. The course, with its undulating landscape and panoramic views of the Atlantic, provides a challenging yet rewarding experience. After a day on the greens, spend the evening on the sand or relaxing in your retreat for the ultimate golf-beach package.

Retreats nearby:

Windmill View, Trevone

No 6 Treglos, Constantine Bay

Find a retreat by one of Cornwall’s finest golf courses and enjoy the best of surf and sun.

7 things to do in Cornwall during Easter

Spend your family holiday on the beach this Easter and enjoy the saltwater lifestyle.

With the Easter holidays just around the corner, there’s an abundance of fun activities for the whole family to enjoy. Whether it’s a day on the sand or a visit to one of Cornwall’s attractions, here’s our favourite things to see and do during your stay this Easter.

Admire the coastline from the water

You’ll find the ocean-mad team at Newquay Activity Centre togged up in wetsuits and sharing their expert tips in everything from surfing to stand-up paddle boarding 360+ days a year. Take the plunge with them as they coasteer around the coast, paddle their huge super stand-up paddleboard through caves, kayak under the famous bridge as you look up to the house on the island, or take on a family surf lesson. They offer something for everyone.

Book online today.

rockpooling

Walk the South West Coast Path

Walk onto any beach in Cornwall and you’ll spot part of the South West Coast Path to your left or right. Whether you choose to explore the rugged north coast and its hidden coves or the tropical south coast, you’ll find something different and exciting each turn you take.

Find your closest route.

sea view over cliffs

Go rockpooling

Head to many beaches in Cornwall at low tide and visitors will be pleasantly surprised with hundreds of rockpools just waiting to be explored. You’ll be treated to a natural display of fascinating and tough creatures, including the Cornish Sucker fish, Worm Pipefish and the Common Shore Crab.

See the top tips from Dr Ben Holt at The Rock Pool Project on rockpooling and where to go.

family rockpooling

Eden Eggstravaganza

Every bit as good as the hype, the Eden Project is on Cornwall’s essential tick list. Outstanding on a sunny day and a good choice when it rains, Eden is an inspired blend of indoor and outdoor fun. Dubbed the eighth wonder of the world by some, this dramatic global garden is housed in tropical biomes the size of 30 football pitches.

Over Easter, discover dozens of activities, crafts and games for the whole family across a three-week programme.

easter egg

Go Foraging

Make the most of the Spring sunshine and get out and about with a forage that will take you deep into Cornwall’s woodlands, hedgerows and on the coast. From Cornish mussels and rose chips to wild herbs and edible plants, you’ll find plenty of wild foods great for cooking.

Read our guide to foraging in Cornwall, including foraging experts The Fat Hen Cookery School who run local courses.

Image credit: The Fat Hen Cookery School

Heligan Gardens

Cornwall’s not only known for its stunning beaches, its magical gardens are home to a wealth of exciting, rare and beautiful plants and trees just waiting to be explored. Visit The Lost Gardens of Heligan in St Austell over Easter and you will creep past the sleeping giant, skip past the Mud Maid and explore higgeldy gardens filled with wonky veg and exotic plants.

Book your Easter break and be by the shoreline this year.

What to do in February half-term in Cornwall

February. The post-Christmas blues, new working year stresses, and winter fatigue often mean that this month gets overlooked, treated as one final hurdle to get over before Spring begins to bloom.

Here in Cornwall, we see February a little differently.

Empty, windswept beaches. Wild seas. Clear water and crisp blue skies. Rambling coast paths. Nature undisturbed. February showcases the wild, untamed beauty of Cornwall before the summer crowds roll in, and is secretly a loved-by-locals time of year, due to its general calmness, great surf and spectacular scenery.

February half-term is no different, and makes for a perfect time to gather the family and escape to the coast, giving you that much needed rejuvenation after a long winter season. Here’s some fresh inspiration for things to do this February half-term in Cornwall.

Browse our beach locations or our selection of retreats to find your perfect February half-term holiday home.

Surf’s up

February is ideal for getting in the water, particularly if you’re a beginner wanting to avoid the busy summer seas. Most of Cornwall’s surf and watersports schools operate all year round, and provide the appropriate kit for chillier water. Try Newquay Activity Centre, Kingsurf in Mawgan Porth or Big Blue Surf School in Bude for a challenging but exhilarating day mastering your chosen activity.

Image credit: Big Blue Surf School

National Maritime Museum

Head to Falmouth’s National Maritime Museum for a rainy day activity that’ll connect you to our oceans. Their regular exhibitions bring new and diverse perspectives to maritime issues, whilst showcasing Cornwall’s fascinating maritime heritage. With 15 galleries across five floors, you’ll take a walk through history. While you’re here, Falmouth is a great place to grab lunch and wander the quirky boutique-lined streets.

Eden Project

A unique and innovative eco project, the Eden Project is an absolute must see this February half-term. This stunning global garden consists of tropical biomes the size of 30 football pitches, including the rainforest biome, home to 1000 species of tropical plants, a fully running waterfall and suspended canopy walkway. Adjacent to this you’ll find the Mediterranean biome, filled to the brim with spiky cacti and ancient olive trees.

Trebah Gardens

A spectacle at any time of year, Trebah Gardens are worth a visit during your February half-term stay. Trebah is bound beneath canopies of sub-tropical foliage that tumble to the edge of the Helford Estuary, where there’s a divine sandy beach perfect for picnic and stone skimming. Families with dogs will particularly love this natural playground.

Wildlife wonders

Get acquainted with some Cornish creatures, from native baby seals to African lions. The Cornish Seal Sanctuary, in Gweek, rescues and rehabilitates over 70 seal pups, which you can see up close. Or, spot them in the wild below the cliffs at Mutton Cove in Hayle, where they often bask on the sand – just be sure to keep the noise down as to not disturb their nap time. For a wet-weather-friendly day out, head to Newquay Zoo to meet over 130 species of the worlds rarest and most endangered animals.

Eat local

Refuel after a wintery walk with soul-quenching food at one of Cornwall’s many gourmet restaurants. From the range of Rick Stein eateries in Padstow, to cosy pubs with great menus such as The Mariners in Rock, take some time this half term to taste the shoreline’s seasonal delights. Many places to eat are kid and pet friendly, too.

Family time

Above all else, a February getaway gives you a chance to be together, away from the chaos of term time routines, work and household chores. Settle into a retreat where everything has been sorted for you, allowing you to truly relax. With games rooms, log burners, lavish dining tables and gorgeous views, cosy evenings in are a delight. Browse our selection of coastal properties just made for family stays.

Book your February half-term retreat.

New Year in Cornwall

Wondering what to do on New Year’s Eve in Cornwall? Welcome in the New Year with a bracing sea dip, don fancy dress and party on the streets of St Ives, or watch harbourside fireworks reflect into moonlit seas.

Here are some of our favourite ways to bring in the New Year in Cornwall.

Not yet booked your accommodation? Search our remaining retreats with up to 20% off.

Dress up for a street party, St Ives

This idyllic Cornish fishing village hosts one of the UK’s most famous New Year’s Eve parties, which sees crowds come from far and wide to hit the streets in fancy dress. Spectacular costumes and vibrant parades floods onto the beach and harbour, where food stands serve up festive treats. Listen for the chime of the bells at midnight, when fireworks fizz and pop over the ocean, bringing in another year in style.

harbour beach st ives

Watch fireworks over Newquay Harbour

Another seaside town that hosts an almighty New Year’s Eve party, the highlight of New Year’s Eve in Newquay is the spectacular fireworks display over the harbour and ocean at midnight. Make your way through streets packed with party goers in fancy dress, squeeze into local taverns or book a table at a sea-view restaurant, and make your way down to the harbour for the countdown to the incoming year.

Have a New Year’s day sea swim, Bude

Blast away the cobwebs and embrace the New Year with an invigorating dip in the ocean. The craze of shedding your wetsuit and leaping into the icy waves has become a New Year’s Day tradition across Cornwall. Join in the icy experience at Crooklet’s Beach in Bude, or head to Summerleaze tidal pool for a more sheltered dip.

Dine by the sea

Fancy food, fine wine and starlit seas. Book a table at a restaurant with a sea view and dine beside the waves. If you’re not big on partying, this is the perfect way to see in the New Year in style, without the headache the next morning.

Enjoy a beach walk

A New Year’s break in Cornwall isn’t all about revelry. Welcome in the New Year at a more relaxing pace, with a stroll along the beach or the South West Coast Path, enjoying the eye-popping scenery as the sea breeze brings a glow to your cheeks. We recommend the 2-mile walk from Watergate Bay to Mawgan Porth, hugging the cliff-tops and keeping your eyes peeled for seabirds and seals at the pristine Beacon Cove along the way.

Book your New Year retreat and welcome in 2024 by the shoreline.

New traditions

As the festive season approaches, create new traditions by the coast on a Christmas holiday in Cornwall. From Christmas morning sea dips to boxing day drinks at your favourite sea-view pub, spending Christmas in a different landscape means creating new festive rituals to return to year on year.

Add that little extra magic to your stay and form lasting memories with these new coastal traditions you could try.

Christmas morning sea swim

This one is local tradition: every year you’ll see Cornish folk (many with santa hats on) running into icy waters on Christmas morning.

Start the day with a dash of exhilaration and dip in the closest sea to your retreat. Then, return back to your retreat, light the fire and get cosy as you unwrap presents with your loved ones.

Christmas drinks

On Christmas afternoon, swap the living room for a seafront pub and raise a glass to coastal wonder. There’s sure to be a lively festive atmosphere, and heading out for a drink is a great way to fight the post-lunch slump whilst taking in some of Cornwall’s incredible views.

Christmas Day coastal walk

Another way to wake yourself up after your festive feast is to refresh with a Christmas Day walk along the South West Coast Path. Rather than nodding off in front of the TV after one too many pigs-in-blankets, get the kids togged up and set off in search of sea vistas.

Beach scavenger hunt

A tradition that the little ones especially will enjoy. Set out on a Christmas treasure hunt along the shoreline, investigating what’s been washed in by the tide. Keep what you find as a Christmas memento, or search for a pretty shell or interesting rock to give to one another. It’s a great way to appreciate nature’s wonder and make gift giving about small acts of love.

Stargazing on Christmas Eve

On Christmas Eve, trade the twinkling indoor lights for the celestial wonders above. Wrap up warm and take a blanket on the beach (or your balcony), gaze at the starlit sky, and share stories beneath the cosmic canopy. It’s a quiet and magical prelude to the days of celebration ahead.

Seafood dinner

Sure, seafood isn’t typically included in traditional Christmas cuisine, but if you’re spending the season in Cornwall, why not sample some of the delightful local produce which the fishermen bring in every day?

Dine in an award-winning Cornish restaurant and make your festive stay extra special. Or, purchase some local fish and include a seafood recipe in your Christmas meal plan.

Image credit: Graham Gaunt photowork

Escape the ordinary and embrace coastal wonder this Christmas with Beach Retreats, creating new traditions by the coast. Book your Christmas stay.

What’s on this October half term in Cornwall

October half term is the perfect time to reconnect with family and nature alike in Cornwall. Blustery beaches, lively surf and a jam-packed schedule of family friendly events make half term week one not to miss. See what’s on for October half term 2023 below.

Book your October half term stay with 20% off selected retreats.

Falmouth Oyster Festival

12th – 15th October 2023

This festival celebrates the start of the oyster dredging season. A five day festival packed with cookery demonstrations by leading local chefs, the opportunity to sample the seafood, oysters, wine and local ale. Entertainment includes children’s shell painting, sea shanties, live music, oyster shucking competitions and the Falmouth working boat race.

Image credit: Jamie Johnson

Eden Project Ice Skating

Starting 14 October 2023 until February 2024

Get your skates on, grab a penguin and hit the ice rink at the Eden Project. With music flooding the sound waves, ice sessions for all ages, and sugary hot chocolates to be enjoyed on the sidelines, a spin around the ice rink is a quintessential way to kick off the autumn and winter season in Cornwall.

Minack Theatre

Visit the Minack Theatre, Cornwall’s world famous open-air theatre which is carved into the granite cliff and set in glorious gardens overlooking the spectacular panorama of Porthcurno Bay.

There is a programme of live performances throughout the year, and outside of these performances you can visit the theatre, stand on stage, explore the glorious sub-tropical gardens full of exotic plants and discover the extraordinary story of how it was created.

This October half term, catch children’s shows The Lonely Lighthouse Keeper and Madagascar Junior.

Image credit: Minack Theatre

Hall for Cornwall

Perfect for a rainy day or evening out of the house, Truro’s Hall for Cornwall has an exciting variety of shows, with theatre performances, live music and interactive kids events throughout the year.  This October half term, the line up includes Tom Fletcher’s ‘There’s a Monster in your Show’, James Martin Live, The Manfreds Maximum Rhythm n Blues, alongside Toddler Time which is on every Tuesday morning until December.

‘Pirates’ at Falmouth Maritime Museum

Running until December 2024

Visit the Maritime museum in Falmouth for their latest major exhibition on Pirates! Explore how popular culture has shaped how we think of pirates today and dive beneath the surface to unearth the harsh and terrifying truth.

To find out, immerse yourself in the digital world of the Sea of Thieves game, land on Treasure Island, meet the man behind Long John Silver and dance a hornpipe with Horatio Pugwash before discovering the dark world of the real pirates of the Caribbean.

Book your October half term stay with 20% off selected retreats.

Discover Sennen

Sennen has it all. A cool, laid-back surf vibe meets traditional fisherman’s cottages and bobbing boats; dolphins dive in the rolling surf; cold pints and pub grub are served at 17th century pubs; and kids and hikers alike soak up the rays along the long stretch of coast.

We recently set off from Gwynver Beach House to explore the area, but you can park at any of the three village car parks (or Gwynver beach car park) if you’re visiting for the day.

See our Relive video from the day.

Let’s go…

Start at Gwynver

To begin your Sennen adventure, set out from Gwynver, a rugged sandy beach with dramatic panoramas from the cliffs above. If you’re staying at Gwynver Beach House, take the short walk from the bottom of your garden, or park up at Gwynver car park and take the steps down to the sand. Be sure to stop for photos at the top, though: this spot offers breathtaking views.

Gwynver beach

If you’re craving some peace and quiet, Gwynver beach is the spot for you. Whether you’re up for picnicking on the sand, catching some waves on your surfboard, or simply basking in the sun’s warmth, Gwynver offers the ideal setting to unwind and recharge. Flanked by sloping cliffs and rocky coastal path, this beach offers a sheltered sunbathing experience.

Coast path

Once you’ve cooled down in the blue waters, head out along the coast path, marked by nature trail signs, which winds around to Sennen Cove. This path is slightly rocky and rugged, with a bit of clambering involved, but its more than worth it for the views as you make your way around towards Sennen.

Dolphins are known to populate this spot, so keep your eyes peeled as you stroll.

Sennen Cove

You’ll arrive at Sennen Cove through the small sand dunes and sea grass. Here, you can stop for another beach nap or paddle, hire surf equipment and take to the waves, or tuck into some snacks and drinks on the sand. This cove is perfect for kids, with its small beach streams, plenty of wet sand for bucket and spade play, and gentle waves between the lifeguard flags, great for bodyboarding.

Sennen village

From the sand, you’re close to any kind of traditional beach food or drink you fancy. Walk just a few steps up to The Old Success Inn, a 17th century pub with a large beer garden overlooking the sea. Here, you can sip some local ales, tuck into a pub lunch, and dolphin watch under a parasol.

Head to the Round House & Capstan Gallery, a unique circular art gallery with lovely views through the crooked windows. Here you can pick up some local artwork to take home with you, or get inspired to do some painting of your own during your stay.

It wouldn’t be a trip to Sennen without enjoying some fish and chips. Tuck into the very best locally caught haddock, with lashings of salt and vinegar, either in one of the old-school seafront diners or taken away and enjoyed on the sand.

Day trips nearby

Sennen is in a prime position in West Cornwall, a short drive from some of Cornwall’s most famous attractions and some lesser-known beauties. If you’re staying here for longer, plan a day out and see what’s nearby.

Land’s End

Just a pebble’s throw away from Sennen, Land’s End is an iconic landmark that marks the westernmost point of mainland England. Take a stroll along the cliffs and snap some photos at the famous signpost – it’s one for the Cornwall bucket list.

Minack Theatre and Porthcurno

Discover the magic of the Minack Theatre, an open-air amphitheatre perched on the cliffs overlooking Porthcurno beach. Starlit evenings are best spent watching a show here, snuggled under a blanket.

Porthcurno beach below is a dream on a summer’s day, with hues that echo the greens and blues of the Maldives.

Mousehole

A short drive from Sennen, Mousehole is probably the closest you’ll get to the fully traditional fishing village atmosphere. Cobbled streets conceal tiny art galleries, delis, a local post office and makeshift plant stalls. You may also be able to purchase the catch of the day from a fisherman if you time it right.

Retreats in Mousehole.

Penzance

This beachy art deco town is home to a colourful array of bars and restaurants, alongside a lido and geothermal pool for 1950s style bathing.

Visit Sennen and stay in one of our retreats nearby, with easy access to beach life.

Luxury charters with One Atlantek

Atlantek – it’s Cornish for Atlantic

As the sun appears over the hills behind the beautiful port of Fowey, a small crowd of people gather to watch the launch of the stunning Rib, Meraud Atlantek, at Caffa Mill. One Atlantek are getting ready to collect the day’s guests from Albert Quay with a day of adventuring and exploration awaiting the family of four who discovered this luxury charter company having met them at Henley Regatta!

What started as a lunch booking at Sam’s on the Beach in Polkerris has turned into much more.

The guests are welcomed by the operations director and skipper of One Atlantek, Tim. As they listen to their safety brief with a fresh coffee in their hands, The brand new 8 metre Ribeye A811 gently bobs against the pontoon. Lifejackets are handed out and the guests climb aboard. Bags are stowed and before they know it, this lucky family are headed out of Fowey in the bright sunshine ready to start their adventure.

Turning to the left out of the harbour mouth they soon arrive at Lantic Bay. This secluded beach has turquoise water and is a good trek to access it by land. The anchor is dropped and a morning swim is the next priority. Watched by a local Seal who is sunning himself on a rock.

Everyone takes turns jumping off the boat and even the kids are dropping comments about how wonderful this place is.

After 45 minutes it’s time to really up the stakes for this group. Tim has spotted dolphins off in the distance and as the group dry themselves off, they are suddenly surrounded by at least a hundred of these majestic creatures. Three of the pod decide that the bow wave is the place to be and the guests are treated to a twenty-minute lesson in what playing in the water really looks like.

As quickly as they arrived, the dolphins are gone and Meraud Atlantek and her passengers are now in the middle of St Austell Bay looking back at the Cornish Alps in the distance.

With the rising tide, the beaches at Silver Mines are the place to be. With no access from the coastal path, these are as close to a private beach as it’s possible to get and the snorkelling is fantastic.

With time flying by, It’s off to Polkerris to be dropped off at Sam’s. Meraud sits waiting just off the beach and with full bellies and big smiles, it’s time to be whisked around Gribben Head and back to Albert Quay where it all began.

One Atlantek are a small local company with some big ambitions. Created in 2022 by Tim Hogg, One Atlantek deliver a truly unique hospitality experience on board their beautiful Rib, Meraud Atlantek. Half Day (4 hours), Day (6 hours) and Extended day (10 hours) charters are available. Have a talk with Tim about creating your perfect day.

Find out more and book your luxury charter today, the perfect experience during your self-catered stay.

New Experiences in Cornwall

A visit to the unique county of Cornwall is the perfect chance to pick-up a new skill, learn something new, or try something different. It might be an old favourite in a new location, or an untested activity you’ve always hankered after. Here’s a round-up of what to do in Cornwall this year and what your stay by the sea could offer this year…

Discover new skies

Cornwall offers dramatic landscapes for night time adventures. In December 2021, West Penwith was recognised as an International Dark Sky Park, joining Bodmin Moor with this designation and the Dark Sky Discovery Site at Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps where you can see the Milky Way pass overhead.

Image credit: Graham Gaunt Photowork

Spend time on ocean time

Why not take some time out from the normal rhythm of life to follow the beat of the tides? From expansive beaches of golden sand and rocky pools teeming with hidden life to high-adrenaline coasteering and water sports at high water. Then there’s reading the waves as they come and go, learning the natural signs of the sea so you can decide what best suits the day’s conditions, from heading in for a swim to grabbing the surfboard.

Go to the ceramic source

China clay is synonymous with St Austell and its surrounding villages; a rich heritage that’s embarking on an artisan revival. Operating out of St Austell’s newly relaunched Market House, along with a host of other makers, Flookan runs a four-week introduction to ceramics course, in the home of china clay, where you can learn a range of skills for working with clay. There’s also one-off workshops and taster sessions running through the year, with private bookings on request.

Image credit: Flookan 

Seek out supper from the sea

Foraging seaweed can be a sustainable, tasty, invigorating journey into a new cuisine. The Fat Hen offers a two-day course in identifying, gathering, preserving and cooking with 15 different seaweeds. You’ll also learn how seaweed can remineralise the body in baths and skincare products.

Find the vines

Cornwall’s relatively mild climate and long sunlight hours make it one of the finest regions for wine production in the UK. The Wild Wine School near Padstow has a commitment to sustainable viticulture, and deals in wine with distinctly untamed notes: its mission is to share wine knowledge and passion “in surroundings that enliven senses and expand minds, calling on nature to add a technicolour edge to your experience”. In its workshop on Organic and Biodynamic Viticulture, you’ll learn the basic concepts of organic and biodynamic viticulture, “from lunar cycles to the special alchemy of plants”, taste six sustainably produced wines, and have the chance to try making one of the Biodynamic preparations.

Image Credit: Ingrid Pop

Ride the West Kernow Way

An 230km off-road route – funded by the European Regional Development Fund’s Experience project – exploring west Cornwall is now fully open. It takes in many of the highlights of the western half of the Cornish peninsula, including the Botallack tin mines, the Bronze Age monument Mên-an-Tol, Land’s End, St Michael’s Mount and Lizard Point. Expect spectacular coastal scenery, hedgerows bursting with wildflowers and ancient tracks across isolated moorland.

Image credit: The West Kernow Way

Explore sea life

Graceful and silent, take to a kayak to explore aquatic habitats and the chance to share secluded coves with seals and cormorants.  Koru Kayaking offer North Coast kayaking around the caves and mining heritage of St Agnes, and the sheltered creeks and coves of the Helford River near Falmouth. For the more experienced, Sea Kayaking Cornwall run a week-long adventure island hopping by kayak around the Scilly Isles.

Image credit: Koru Kayaking

Apnea or freediving, descending under water on a single breath has a long history, with roots in yoga, meditation and breathing techniques. Explore the wilderness underwater with Aquacity, based in the sheltered Porthkerris Cove on the Lizard. Aquacity offer a half-day introduction to freediving from May. There’s also a more advanced course giving an entry-level qualification.

Image credit: Daan Verhoeven

Take the geothermal waters

Jubilee Pool, the striking Art Deco sea water pool on Penzance’s promenade now has its new geothermal pool up and running, heated to 30-35 degrees via its own 410m deep geothermal well. So the pool now offers Geo & Dine, where you can enjoy an evening dip under the moonlight in the steamy geothermal pool, followed by a specially selected, fresh locally-sourced three-course meal. Or try its Geo & Fizz sessions, where you can buy an alcoholic drink from the cafe and enjoy some bubbles in the water.

Find a discounted stay by the sea on our special offers page, and browse our various beach locations to explore a new place this year.