Whats in a name?


An overlooked aspect of owning a holiday let can be in the naming of the property.

Does it matter? Surely the photographs, description and right pricing are more important? Arguably, yes. But the name of a property can excite potential guests, give your retreat personality and make it more memorable.

If purchasing a house or cottage, avoid using the standard postal address, for example 17 High Road or 41 Beechwood Avenue. It won’t excite prospective guests and may suggest the property is not in a particularly ‘holiday-esque’ area, rather that it is located on a housing estate or in a residential area. A specific name suggests this retreat is unique and has its own character.

So What to Name Your Property?

Quite often it is possible to create a name from the characteristics of a property or the location and view. Such a name can reflect the key selling points, such as views of the sea or countryside, a remote location, or the heritage or personality of an area.

Therefore Seagull Perch, Crab Pot Cottage, Horizon, and Captain’s Launch may work for a seaside holiday let. Similarly, Oak House, Greenacres and Woodland View work inland.

The next step is to then be more creative and reflect the personality of an area. At the Village in Watergate Bay, all of the houses have been named after Cornish Saints, which has resulted in memorable names, such as Tudy, Mabyn, Agnes and Ernie. It’s no coincidence these are some of the more popular properties.

And being more adventurous, a property with direct access onto a beach, may be called The Last Step, The House on the Beach or The Sandcastle to help convey this desirable trait.

A Name Change

If the property has just been purchased, it is easier to ‘christen’ for holiday letting. If the property is currently trading as a holiday let, there will be the strong possibility of repeat guests looking to stay again. A name change may make a particular property harder to find so it is important to ensure it is still findable going forward.